Treasure Hunt in Google Maps

And the guys in Google seem to have lots of free time. Following the concept they created last year with an 8-bit Google Maps, this year they come with a new idea for April’s fool: an old style Treasure Hunt. I don’t know for how long it’s gonna be available but this trick looks very odd (tho funny).

When you open Google Maps for the first time you can see on the upper right options of visualization, an option that states ” Treasure”. Click it. That’s it, you can see now your map as an old middle aged map. They say you can find some hidden treasure chests, but I think it’d be very hard and time-consuming.

Munich vintage

But what happens when you wanna have a closer look? Well, unfortunately it zooms in until a definite distance, as they didn’t rendered all buildings and streets, just the main ones. However, if you choose the “Street view”, you will have a surprise having an old telescope-like look.

Munich landscape vintage

Aaaaand, that’s this year’s Easter Egg from Google Maps. Maybe not so special but, quite creative and entertaining. Have a look at your city. How much stuff is in it? Did you see the most interesting things?

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Naquito Abroad: The Oktoberfest Challenge

Finally my first video of “Naquito Abroad” is out. And after days of editing, I finally got some material out. The language of that series of videos is most of the time Spanish. But, as in my other videos, you can find the subtitles in English. Actually, a big portion of the video is also in English (when I was rambling in the tents of Oktoberfest).

This is the product of a day in the biggest Beer festival in the world. I show you here the history and organization of the Oktoberfest, so you can have a look into the event as everyone else.

For a deeper and more detailed information of it, you can read it (although in Spanish) in my other post “Bienvenido al Oktoberfest“.

So, come this year, but in the meantime, Proooooost!

Naquito abroad!

Good day, my people, this time I want to share with you the trailer of a new project I’m starting. This 2013 I decided to record my adventures around Europe for you to see what can you find in these places.

As I’m going to live it totally with the Mexican mentality that I have, I decided to name it “Naquito abroad”. Naquito is the diminished word in Spanish for “naco”, one of the many interesting subcultures of Mexico. A naco is basically a person without cultural background nor proper education. Well, I wouldn’t consider myself as uneducated, but I do consider myself as an apprentice in this world. Besides, I take it in the funniest way.

“Naquito abroad” will be my personal videodiary in all these journeys. I hope you like it and you feel attracted to visit those places. I’ll offer certainly lots of information (historical and cultural) about the places I’m going to. I’m gonna meet new people, and most of all, I’m looking forward to have fun here.

Thank you very much for watching. Feedback is always welcome and Happy new year!

Song of the day: Fallaste corazón – Pedro Infante

The mexican culture has still some bits of “Machismo” in it, but is actually double faced. The Machos are people unable to be in contact with their feelings and try to set a screen, so when they are faced with their feelings, they react in very bad ways.

In the mexican society, the Machos are allowed to cry for 2 things only: family and women. And the way to do so is always singing and drinking. You can see it in almost every classic film of Mexico’s Golden Era, where a broken-hearted man sings to his beloved woman in sadness.

I found it always funny, and instead of making me sad or something, always made me smile. Beginning the year I felt a bit homesick and started to sing lots of Mexican songs, being Chavela Vargas, Vicente Fernandez, Antonio Aguilar, and many others a constant reminder of my culture.

Cuco Sánchez composed “Fallaste Corazón” (You failed, heart) many years ago, and several artists have made great covers of this song. Personally I think Chavela Vargas gave the best performance with her amazing voice and feeling. Damn! You can even feel her pain while she sings! Moving!

Anyways, we Mexicans have some weird ways to overcome tragedies, but it actually works 🙂 “Fallaste corazón” is dedicated to the heart of a Macho, yeah, the heart. And the Macho is mocking at his own heart. Yeah, bit weird, right? But this is one of the thousands of expressions you can find in Mexican songs.

Here you have one of the most entertaining performances from Pedro Infante “The idol of Mexico”. He sings the song as it should, with sadness, taunt, anger and passion. Subtitles are included in the video:

Ay ay ay!

Everything about Finance and Investment

For some weeks now, I’ve been learning about Finance and Market, it is a very challenging field for me and, as usual, has given me a lot of new knowledge.

This time, through the great group “Big Think“, Bill Ackman, CEO of Pershing Square Capital Management, explains fast but on detail everything you need to know about Finance and Investment.

Taking us by the hand and with really simple examples, his very graphical explanation gets rid of any common mistake we could have.

Highly recommended to learn a bit more. Less than an hour but a lot to catch.

Understanding mexicans: Día de los Muertos

“El día de los muertos” or “The day of the Dead” is a national holiday in Mexico and it is full of tradition, a mix of faiths and a deep feeling of nostalgy and redemption, along a very special relationship between men and Death. Hereby I present what I think we Mexicans feel regards Death.

Thanks for watching and for your comments!

The song of the day: Danzón No. 2 – Arturo Márquez

More than a song, it is actually an amazing instrumental composition. If not familiar with Latin American music, let me tell you that there is a wide range of music styles in our beloved continent. Not everything is Salsa, my friend.

Danzón was born in Cuba in the late years of the XIX century and the early XX century. Because of its neighborhood with Mexico, precisely at the Atlantic coast, the Mexican nation adopted the dance with joy and became very loved as it is a romantic and flirting approach for the dancers, full of lust, enchanting moves and passion.

The danzón (which literally would mean in Spanish something like “Big dance”) became popular in the region along the Gulf of Mexico, being Veracruz the most representative place of it (tho Tabasco and Campeche have good representatives too). However, the melody today is “Danzón No. 2” from the Maestro Arturo Márquez, the talented composer born in Sonora. Nowadays is this melody almost a symbol of Danzones and thus of Latin American music in general. No, it is not THE symbol, but it is for sure now a classic.

Many may not like Dudamel‘s version, as he uses to be very “fogozo” in his conduction. He gives another interpretation. Wagner would shit inward for sure if he hears Dudamel directing with his style, but we must not forget that this is a Danzón, a Latin American song and I personally think that Dudamel has taken it beyond and it is a real pleasure to listen to it.

Well, too much chit-chat. Following is my favorite version of Danzón No.2. Enjoy!